observations on gear, adventure, and the world

Where my head is pointing.

Over the last four years I’ve had lots of hobbies. Lots of dabbling. I started a company, learned how to build websites, started recording a podcast, a couple blogs, and countless other projects. Then a year and a half ago I started climbing again, then I quit my job, and got into a PhD program and suddenly all I was doing was studying and climbing (working as well still). I realized that just wasn’t bored anymore. Also, I realized that I’d been bored for several years, and that was where all the projects were coming from.

Now math and climbing have my full attention. I’ll be posting at tenlitre.com about the math side of things, but I’ve got a bit to say over here about climbing and other adventures.

THIS has my attention, and trad is the only way it could ever be.

THIS has my attention, and trad is the only way it could ever be.

Now on to the pun in the title. Headpointing. A version of redpointing where the protection for the route (useually a rather short route) is minimal, so the leader reherses the route on toprope until she is ready to send. The saying that “good climbing is the best protection” expands to “good climbing is most of your protection.”

I think this is a great way to find safe, adventurous climbing.

I live in the Wasatch where there is a strong anti/limited bolting ethic. Maybe it’s like this everywhere but folks are always on Mountain project complaining that there are bolts too close to trad lines and that it ruins the experiance.

Now, I’m totally in support of differing ethics for differing places (I grew up in Minnesota climbing at Taylor’s Falls (no bolts), Devil’s Lake (no bolts), Palisade Head (no bolts, no chalk), the WAZ (no climbing), and Barn Bluff (bolts), and I don’t think you should put a bolt ladder next to a crack that takes gear, however in a place like Big Cottonwood Canyon where discontinuous systems of cracks mean you could place offset brass every six inches and rip them all with a fall I’m inspired not to be a purist.

I’m thinking of this because of a couple of routes “Alien”  a 5.10a first climbed by Drew Bedford, Pokey Amory, Jamie Cameron, and Conrad Anker, and “Dirty Rotten Horror” 5.10d. Both are difficult but possible to protect, and both have bolts nearby, and MP comments on both have plenty of bolt bravado.

In both cases the bolts don’t get in my way at all. On Dirty Rotton Horror, which I’ve dialed on top rope, I never even see the nearby bolts and am psyched to try the arete they protect as it’s one of the few other lines at the cliff that looks fun to climb. On Alien I clip the bolts on  lead, and if I’m of the mind I’ll start headpointing to lead up to a trad lead on the route. In the first case the bolts have no impact on the route, in the second case the bolts improve the experiance making it much safer and simpler to work the route.

Here’s the post that got me thinking about this:

New E8 at Kilnsey for Nik Jennings

Exodus (E8 6c) – the failures from nik jennings on Vimeo.

So get out there and clip what you wanna clip and bolt what’s fit to bolt.

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